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Asbestos Surveying, Consultancy and Analytics

Asbestos is a dangerous substance which is still found in materials in many buildings.  If you are responsible for the maintenance of any non-domestic premises or are a landlord of domestic premises you have legal responsibilities. You can see more about your responsibilities as a building owner in our knowledge base.

We can develop a top-level strategy to cover a whole organisation, carry out an audit to identify gaps in compliance and develop the processes required for continuous improvement. 

We can help with surveys, risk assessments and management plans, including laboratory testing where required. Broadland Group is a UKAS accredited testing laboratory undertaking bulk analysis for the presence of asbestos.

We can also plan for and supervise the control or removal of asbestos in building works.

The most important requirement is to produce and maintain an Asbestos Management Plan which

  • identifies the location, quantity, condition and type of asbestos in your building
  • assesses the risk of anyone being exposed to asbestos fibres
  • details the steps required to manage these risks

We also provide training for building surveyors and for operators who may come into contact with asbestos in their work. Find out more >

 

For further infomation on our Asbestos Surveying, Consultancy and Analytics services please contact one of our offices below:

Eastern office 01603 251775  
Southern office 01268 574344
Northern office 01246 267954

Bulk Analysis Sampling

1.1) This is a photograph taken using our Stereo Microscope of a sample of insulating board brought into the Norwich laboratory for analysis. You can clearly see both amosite (brown) asbestos and chrysotile (white) asbestos fibres extruding from the plaster-based, grey matrix.
1.2) Using our more powerful Polarised Light Microscope we can positively identify the fibre-type. The photograph below shows what some isolated amosite fibres look like using the first order red compensating plate (also called a tint plate), you can see the distinctive yellow and blue colours which demonstrate one of several important attributes of asbestos fibres.
2.1) This is a photograph taken with our Stereo Microscope of some floor covering brought into our Chesterfield laboratory for analysis. You can see three types of fibre here, crocidolite (blue) asbestos and chrysotile (white) asbestos present in the grey backing material, along with the bright white man-made mineral fibres within the green vinyl layer.
2.2) Chrysotile fibres extracted from the grey backing material and are shown below, photographed using the Polarised Light Microscope with the first order red compensating plate to give the classic blue and yellow colours necessary as part of the identification of asbestos fibres.
1.1) This is a photograph taken using our Stereo Microscope of a sample of insulating board brought into the Norwich laboratory for analysis. You can clearly see both amosite (brown) asbestos and chrysotile (white) asbestos fibres extruding from the plaster-based, grey matrix.
1.2) Using our more powerful Polarised Light Microscope we can positively identify the fibre-type. The photograph below shows what some isolated amosite fibres look like using the first order red compensating plate (also called a tint plate), you can see the distinctive yellow and blue colours which demonstrate one of several important attributes of asbestos fibres.
2.1) This is a photograph taken with our Stereo Microscope of some floor covering brought into our Chesterfield laboratory for analysis. You can see three types of fibre here, crocidolite (blue) asbestos and chrysotile (white) asbestos present in the grey backing material, along with the bright white man-made mineral fibres within the green vinyl layer.
2.2) Chrysotile fibres extracted from the grey backing material and are shown below, photographed using the Polarised Light Microscope with the first order red compensating plate to give the classic blue and yellow colours necessary as part of the identification of asbestos fibres.

Your
Legal
Responsibilities

Under the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2012 , anyone responsible for maintenance of non-domestic premises or landlord of domestic premises, has a 'duty to manage' the asbestos in them. You need an Asbestos Register of materials and an Asbestos Management Plan for dealing with them.